Condolences to the Weller Family

A long standing family member on Limerick Lake, Adele Weller, passed away in Irondequoit on Tuesday, December 3, 2019.
rdc135773-1_20191205.jpgx.jpeg
Pre-deceased by her husband Bruce and son Glenn. Adele is survived by her children; Gordon (Bonnie) Weller, Debi (Rick) Wahl, daughters-in-law; Candi Weller and Linda Williams, grandchildren; Adam, Karen, Kristin, Lisa, Patrick and J.C., 5 great grandchildren, sister Barbara (Walt) Greenfield, brother-in-law, Donald Weller, also several nieces, nephews and friends.

Her funeral service was held Monday, December 9, 11:00 am. Entombment Riverside Cemetery. To share a memory or send the family a condolence, please visit www.harrisfuneralhome.com.

Published in Rochester Democrat And Chronicle from Dec. 4 to Dec. 6, 2019

Condolences to the Sheppard Family

PATRICK SHEPPARD Patrick passed away on Wednesday, November 20, 2019, age 76, with his wife Linda and nephew Owen at his side. Patrick is lovingly remembered by Linda, his daughter Victoria and her partner Jonathan Page, his granddaughter Nia and Nia’s father Charles Onyango, Patrick’s brother Brian and partner, Sheila Lacroix, Linda’s sister Nancy Cymbalisty and her husband Ron, Patrick’s nephews and nieces Owen and Emily Sheppard and Kevin and Lindsey Cymbalisty, Jonathan’s daughters Kara and Madison, and many friends and colleagues. He was predeceased by his dear sister-in-law Barbara Sheppard, mother of Owen and Emily. He will be missed by his cousin Tom and the extended Sheppard family. In spite of the rare degenerative brain disease-progressive supranuclear palsy-that so negatively impacted his life for the past six or so years, Patrick approached every day without complaint, was tenacious in his will to live, and welcomed all the visits and outings from his many friends and family. Born in Toronto on July 6, 1943, Patrick attended Jarvis Collegiate Institute in downtown Toronto and then went on to study at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, graduating with a law degree from the University of New Brunswick in 1969. Patrick spent three terms as a Toronto alderman (city councillor) before resuming his legal career with the Ontario Public Service Employees Union and as Discipline Counsel at the Law Society of Upper Canada. In 1991, Patrick was appointed to the bench of the Ontario Court of Justice and sat in Newmarket and Scarborough before moving to the Old City Hall in downtown Toronto. Patrick’s contributions to the legal profession were numerous and significant. He saw his position on the bench as a platform from which he could not only uphold the rule of law but also improve the lives of Ontarians, particularly those most in need. He is best known for his landmark judgement R. v. Parker (medical marijuana), and for being one of the co-founders of Ontario’s Gladue Court, along with Justice Rebecca Shamai, Justice Brent Knazan, and Jonathan Rudin of Aboriginal Legal Services. The Gladue Court or Aboriginal Persons Court was established in response to the 1999 Supreme Court of Canada decision in R. v. Gladue that instructed courts to consider alternative sanctions to imprisonment, “with particular attention to the circumstances of aboriginal offenders.” This first Gladue Court opened in Toronto’s Old City Hall in 2001, and there are now an additional seven courts serving self-identifying Indigenous persons across Ontario. In 2016, for his incredible passion and leadership, Patrick received the Champion of Justice Award from Aboriginal Legal Services, celebrating the Gladue Court’s 15th anniversary and Aboriginal Legal Services’ 25th anniversary. In a speech from that event, one of his dear friends and colleagues wrote in part: “That’s the way I suspect he’d like to be known and honoured: in all his humanity. The life of privilege, the compassion of everyman … an inspiration to all of us who think we can improve the system. It’s about the beating heart of a human being.” In addition to his dedication to his work, Patrick’s passion was travel. He and Linda travelled extensively, starting their married life in a Volkswagen camper van in Europe for nine months in 1969-70. With their daughter Victoria, they visited places like Uzbekistan in the former Soviet Union in the ’90s, when it was not a well-known destination, and they were able to shake hands with Nelson Mandela on a visit to South Africa in the year 2000. With his sister-in-law Nancy and brother-in-law Ron, Patrick and Linda had some momentous adventures sea-kayaking in Belize and surviving a blizzard on the floe edge on Baffin Island. Patrick and Victoria did some father-daughter bonding when they both became certified scuba divers when Victoria was a teenager. Not to be forgotten was Patrick’s great love for the cottage on Limerick Lake. He and Linda spent many weeks in summers there with friends and family, Patrick always the expert barbeque chef, and in his spare time trail-building on the hundred acres of water- access-only cottage land. When they were in their fifties, Patrick introduced Linda to the joys of overnight canoe trips, and for many years, they looked forward to planning their next summer excursion, just the two of them, often in Algonquin Park. The family wants to recognize the compassionate care that Patrick received from staff at his residence in Christie Gardens. They are also grateful for the dedication of loyal friends and volunteers, and for the organizing talents of John Sewell, all of whom continued to make Patrick’s life warmer and richer even when this became more and more challenging. The family welcomes donations in Patrick’s memory to the Canada-Mathare Education Trust (https://www.cmetrust.org/donate), founded by his daughter Victoria in 2006. CMETrust provides education opportunities to children from Kenya’s second-largest slum in Nairobi, Mathare. Patrick visited Mathare twice and was an enthusiastic supporter of CMETrust and so proud of the compassion and tenacity of everyone involved. A celebration of Patrick’s life will be held at a later date. Condolences may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

FOCA Cottage closing time

FOCA Elert – October 2019
Advocacy & Policy Updates
Electricity Pricing Update

FOCA has been informed that Hydro One has submitted a “Motion of Change” to the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), recommending against the elimination the Seasonal Class of customer, as expected. The issue is not yet resolved, but FOCA continues to post all details, here:  https://foca.on.ca/electricity-pricing/

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Provincial Policy Statement Update
The Province is making changes to their land use planning priorities. On behalf of Ontario’s waterfront property owners, FOCA will be weighing-in on the proposed reforms to the Provincial Policy Statement, to emphasize the need for clarity and priority for natural heritage and our water resources. Learn more (and consider commenting by October 21) here: https://foca.on.ca/land-use-planning-overview/
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100 Debates
image: Clifford Skarstedt, Peterborough Examiner

FOCA’s Executive Director Terry Rees moderated a standing-room-only federal candidates’ debate in Peterborough, as part of the “100 Debates for the Environment” national campaign. Find out where YOUR candidates stand on the issues that matter to you, by consulting links and resources available on the FOCA Federal Election webpage.

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Federal Election
Canadians will vote for our federal government on Monday, October 21st.
In a federal election, even if you own property in more than one place, you may vote only once. FOCA recently asked Elections Canada to clarify if such property owners can select to vote in their cottage riding. See the response, and get links to the major registered parties, here:
FOCA’s Gold-level Sponsors

Sponsors
support our work!

Please, support them.

CottageLINK Rental Management
FOCA Fall Seminar for Lake Associations
Saturday, November 16, 2019 – 9:00am to 3:00pm, Boulevard Club, Toronto.
Seats are filling up fast for the Fall Seminar; reserve your spot as soon as possible. Register now!
“I believe that the FOCA meetings are a do-not-miss for as many associations as can reasonably get to them.”  ~attendee at the last event
Get environmental and policy updates on cottage country hot topics and emerging issues including: short-term rentals, electricity pricing, septic re-inspection programs, results of the FOCA road survey, water quality monitoring and lake stressors. Member associations: send a representative from your lake association to this gathering of peers, subject experts, the FOCA staff and Board of Directors. Find out more about the event: https://foca.on.ca/fall-seminar-2019/
FOCA Programs
Lake Partner Program – How you can help
Lake Partner Program
We need your input in a short FOCA survey that will explain how you value and use the Lake Partner Program long-term water quality data. Please take a moment to add your voice! Take the survey:
Know someone else who loves this program? Please share the survey link with them!
Apply for this Award
FOCA Achievement Award
Nominate your association for the next FOCA Achievement Award. Large or small associations can apply, and accomplishments should be current, but can include long-standing efforts.
We love hearing your success stories!
 
Apply by November 30th. Details and the nomination form are available, here:
FOCA’s Silver-level Sponsors
OPG
Cottage Life
HydroOne
AVIVA
Asian Carps Awareness
FOCA’s very own Executive Director is one of the partners featured in this video, created by Fisheries and Oceans Canada, on the subject of Asian carps and what is being done to prevent their establishment in the Great Lakes:
Protecting the Great Lakes from Asian carps
Members along the Great Lakes: please share this with everyone at your waterbody! Here’s the link: https://youtu.be/2oCiwbrlAuc
Upcoming Events
H20 2019
Saturday, October 19, 2019 – Toronto. FOCA’s Terry Rees will be one of the speakers at this event, covering topics from water levels, septic systems, electricity rates and climate impacts on water. Co-hosted by Georgian Bay Forever and the Georgian Bay Association. Click here for details and to register.
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2019 Lake Links

Saturday, October 26, 2019 – Perth. FOCA will once again be pleased to support and present at this annual stewardship event. The theme is “Enhancing, Restoring and Exploring: Applications for Citizen Science on your Lake.” Register here.

FOCA’s Bronze-level Sponsors
Nature Clean New Logo 2013
Sunspace
Dock in a Box
OOWA
Canadian Canoe Museum
EORN
Fall Safety

Carbon Monoxide Safety

As the weather cools, we turn once again to our home heating systems. Remember: if you have a gas, propane, oil or wood-burning heating system or appliance, you need Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors! You cannot see, smell or taste CO. Keep your family safe:
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Cold Water Safety

Planning a boat ride over the Thanksgiving Long Weekend? Be prepared for the danger of cold water immersion by reviewing these important tips from our partners at the Canadian Safe Boating Council:
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Cottage Closing Tips

Cottages and summer homes are most vulnerable to thieves and subject to damage or vandalism in the off-season, from the week following Thanksgiving, to the weeks prior to Victoria Day. How you close-up for the season makes a difference. Get tips here:

While we’re thinking of it… please be cautious about announcing your extended absences (from home OR from the cottage) on social media! You may be “inviting” trouble.
Happy Thanksgiving

From all of our families, to all of yours, we wish you a wonderful Canadian Thanksgiving weekend! The FOCA office will be closed until Tuesday morning, as we enjoy some family and cottage time.

Looking for a quiz to share about Thanksgiving? Try this one, from our friends at Cottage Life(Editor’s note: hmmm, I only got 4 out of 10.)
FOCA is the Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Associations,
the voice of the waterfront for over half a century
info@foca.on.ca    |    705-749-3622    |    https://foca.on.ca
Stay Connected with FOCA:
Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter  View our videos on YouTube
Didn’t receive this message in your Inbox? Join thousands of Elert subscribers:
 
FOCA believes everyone has the right to hear about issues that affect waterfront Ontario. 
Those who have an existing relationship with FOCA may receive email from us, based on principles of Express or Implied Consent in Canadian Anti Spam legislation.
You can unsubscribe from Elerts at any time, using the ‘Safe Unsubscribe’ link below.

FOCA Fall update

FOCA
FOCA Elert – September 2019
FOCA Fall Seminar for Lake Associations
Saturday, November 16, 2019 – Toronto.
“Why attend this event? To get inspired, motivated, recharge your enthusiasm and focus!” 
~ an attendee at the last event
Receive environmental and policy updates on cottage country hot topics and emerging issues including: short-term rentals, electricity pricing, septic re-inspection programs, results of the FOCA road survey, water quality monitoring and lake stressors. Member associations: send a representative from your lake association to this gathering of peers, subject experts, the FOCA staff and Board of Directors. Find out more about the event:
FOCA’s Gold-level Sponsors

Sponsors
support our work!

Please, support them.

CottageLINK Rental Management
Advocacy & Policy Updates
Electricity Pricing

On September 17th, the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) issued an order related to the matter of Hydro One eliminating the Seasonal Class of customer. The issue is not yet resolved, but FOCA has the update for you, here:

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Federal Election

Canadians will vote for our federal government this October. In a federal election, even if you own property in more than one place, you may vote only once. FOCA recently asked Elections Canada to clarify if such property owners can select to vote in their cottage riding. See the response, and get links to the major registered parties, here:

Great Lakes, Great Problems
FOCA on The Agenda
image source: @theAgenda Twitter feed
FOCA’s Executive Director Terry Rees (at left in the image) participated in a panel discussion that aired on TVO’s The Agenda with Steve Paikin on September 16th. Terry, Nicola Crawhall, Gail Krantzberg, and Gord Miller discussed tough issues facing the Great Lakes watershed, the cause and impact of high water levels, and what needs to happen next. Watch the episode here:
FOCA Programs
Cottage Succession Seminar Series

Saturday, September 21, 2019 – Haliburton. Our final session of the season with estate lawyer Peter Lillico took place at the Haliburton Campus of Fleming College, co-hosted by the Soyers Lake Ratepayers Association and the Lake Kashagawigamog Organization.

Thanks to everyone who joined us at one of our 2019 events!  Missed out, or just want to revisit the topic with family this fall? Consider a DVD purchase of one of Peter’s talks. Visit:

FOCA’s Silver-level Sponsors
OPG
Cottage Life
HydroOne
AVIVA
Upcoming Events
H20 2019
Saturday, October 19, 2019 – Toronto. FOCA’s Terry Rees will be one of the speakers at this half day event, co-hosted by Georgian Bay Forever and the Georgian Bay Association. Click here for details and to register.
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2019 Lake Links

Saturday, October 26, 2019 – Perth. FOCA will once again be pleased to support and present at this annual stewardship event. The theme is “Enhancing, Restoring and Exploring: Applications for Citizen Science on your Lake.” Registration is now open at this link.

Apply for this Award
The most recent award was presented to the White Lake Cottagers Association in March 2019.
FOCA Achievement Award
Nominate your association for the next FOCA Achievement Award! Large or small associations can apply, and accomplishments should be current, but can include long-standing efforts. We love hearing your success stories.
 
Apply by November 30th. Details and the nomination form are available, here:
FOCA’s Bronze-level Sponsors
Nature Clean New Logo 2013
Sunspace
Dock in a Box
OOWA
Canadian Canoe Museum
EORN
Recent Events Attended
Chesley Lake Association Meeting
August 31, 2019 – South Bruce Peninsula. FOCA participated in a meeting of our member group, the Chesley Lake Cottage Association, a kettle lake near Lake Huron. See a 3-minute video update FOCA made on that trip, which also includes your invite to the FOCA Fall Seminar:
FOCA visits Chesley Lake and the Bruce Peninsula 2019
FOCA visits the Bruce Peninsula 2019
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Biodiversity Meeting
September 17, 2019 – Toronto. FOCA participated in the meeting of environmental partners at the Ontario Biodiversity Council meeting. (Pictured: 15 year old Nathan Feltmate presenting his summary of @IPBES and other recent biodiversity reporting.)
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Safe Boating Meeting

September 19, 2019 – Mississauga. FOCA met with boating partners and industry representatives at the annual symposium of the Canadian Safe Boating Council (CSBC). See fall boating resources on their “Stretching the Season” webpage. (Pictured: John Gullick, Past Chair of CSBC speaks at the symposium.)

Asian Carps Awareness
Preventing Asian carps and other invasive species from entering the Great Lakes is the best way to protect native fish populations. Be part of the fight to prevent the spread of invasive species, and find out more, here:
FOCA is the Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Associations,
the voice of the waterfront for over half a century
info@foca.on.ca    |    705-749-3622    |    https://foca.on.ca
Stay Connected with FOCA:
Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter  View our videos on YouTube
Didn’t receive this message in your Inbox? Join thousands of Elert subscribers:
 
FOCA believes everyone has the right to hear about issues that affect waterfront Ontario. 
Those who have an existing relationship with FOCA may receive email from us, based on principles of Express or Implied Consent in Canadian Anti Spam legislation.
You can unsubscribe from Elerts at any time, using the ‘Safe Unsubscribe’ link below.
Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Associations,#201 – 159 King Street, Peterborough, ON K9J 2R8 Canada
Sent by communications@foca.on.ca in collaboration with
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65,000 acres in new hands

Dear Fellow Cottagers,

On Friday evening August 30, 2019 myself and two members of our executive group attended an open house and presentation put on by the Forest Land Group, the current owners of the 65,000 acres that was previously owned by J.M. Longyear Company.

While the invitations were sent to all municipalities there was no representation from any of the municipalities including elected persons or municipal staff. There was a rep from Quinte Conservation but not Crowe Valley Conservation Authority, which oversees our watershed. Also in attendance were a few “adjacent owners” and a rep from the Limerick Hunt Club.

The presentation was conducted by Matt Sampson, the Region Manger  for the Forestland Group. His area covers from West Virginia to Northern Ontario.

The 65,000 acre Bancroft area parcel is owned by Garden River Forest Lands (the Canadian Entity that holds formal title), Heartwood Advisory Vlll (the US-based (Timber Investment Management Organization (TIMO) which is a public investment vehicle) and Forestland Group as managing partner with local site management under Forestlands direction is JM Longyear Can ULC which is a new group.

A TIMO  is a special Income Tax Advantaged investment fund that exists under US law.   There are strict limits on what a TIMO can and cannot do. In this case the only active management allowed is for timber production.  

The day-to-day site issues will be managed out of the Bancroft office across from Tim Hortons on 62 north. I believe and is staffed by Jeff Holt, Scott Brown with Melissa Holt  in administration.   These are all JM Longyear employees.

 

Forestland’s HQ is in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and of the staff of approximately 30, 60% are forestry specific professionals with Natural Resources degrees. They currently manage approximately 2.7 million acres.

 

The Northeast region has 345,000 acres with four consulting shops and has approximately 50-60 timber sales per year totaling approximately 140,000 cords/year.

What they do is actively manage the resource. Their premise is that properly managed forests build value.

 

Natural re-generation is important and if site conditions suggest to plant then they do. They will also diversify species of trees planted if it makes sense for the area.

Any spraying (BT) will be buffered and they will not use products that could harm waters/fish or animals. They use leaf-based materials and not ground-based. BT is a natural occurring chemical. This would be used for things like tent caterpillars but as mentioned a moist spring blossoms fungus sufficiently to kill off tent caterpillars.

 

Harvesting is heavily audited. Bridges and culverts (infrastructure) will be brought up to standard. Forestlands want to be “Good Neighbors”. They say they will co-operate fully with public interests. They anticipate no major agreement changes this year

Some responses to questions from the floor:

There was mention of standards certificates and both SFI and FSC were mentioned.  They have both but prefer to apply SFI as it is a set of standards that clarifies to the general public and certifies that they are managing responsibly and sustainably. The property will be audited every other year and stake holders (i.e. LWRA) will be part of the audit team. SFI has proven to be more efficient, consistent and effective than FSC.

Forest carbon project offsets is part of their consideration. They have yet to fully inventory the properties but its in process

Their local office in Bancroft can be reached at 613-332-2363 and is open Mon-Friday, 9-5.

Part of their group managing forests is Ecosystem Services. They are not a mining company and have no interest in mining and should they be approached on the subject it would be weighed carefully. They are not a real estate company. 

Part of their profit goes towards managing forest re-generation.

They clearly indicated that they want to add value to the land and when they are completed, usually a 10 year window, it will be sold.  The bulk of their investment funding comes from pension investments and other like investments.

They certainly appeared to be forthright and open about their intentions.  We have certainly opened lines of communication with them.

There will be a map in pdf coming that will detail their holdings. Interestingly it doesn’t have property on Mephisto lake as the crown land timbering is still with JM Longyear corporation.

I have invited the Regional Manager of the Forestland Group to speak at our next Annual General Meeting, tentatively being held on June 27th, 2020.

Best Regards,

Mike Douglas-Hecker

Tel: 647-290-1326

Bancroft General Location Map

FOCA August 2019 update

FOCA Elert – late August 2019
Advocacy & Policy Updates
Electricity Pricing

We are still awaiting the Ontario Energy Board‘s decision about the elimination of the seasonal rate class. In the meantime, the media has been calling almost daily for quotes from FOCA, and Hydro One has established a Customer Service line to answer your questions. Get important links and updates here:

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Boating Safety
Boating Traffic

News of recent tragedies on Ontario lakes is a stark reminder that we all need to be vigilant on the water, for everyone’s sake. Nighttime boating has specific risks and requires extra caution, notably: reduced speeds and the use of running lights. For more safety information, visit:

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Federal Election

Canadians will vote for our federal government this October. In a federal election, even if you own property in more than one place, you may vote only once. FOCA recently asked Elections Canada to clarify if such property owners can select to vote in their cottage riding. See their response, and get links to the major registered parties, here:

FOCA’s Gold-level Sponsors

Sponsors
support our work!

Please, support them.

CottageLINK Rental Management
Asian Carps Awareness

Do you know a teacher looking for invasive species resources, or have a young, aspiring angler in the family? Click the image to download a colouring sheet (PDF, 1 page) from FOCA about Asian carps, that you can share, so kids can learn more about invasive fishes.

Association Tip: this would make a good addition to the “Kids’ Corner” of your next newsletter or e-news!
Help FOCA to spread the word across the Great Lakes watershed about the risk of invasive Asian carps. Find more information, here:
FOCA Programs
Lake Partner Program – Photo Contest
Thanks to everyone who sent in photos of water sampling with young helpers this summer!
The winner of the boating safety prize is:
Marilyn K. of Big Basswood Lake
(municipality of Huron Shores)
Here are her twin three-year-old grandsons, helping with water clarity measurements earlier this month. “They both were quite interested in the proceedings,” she reported.
Now that’s what we call starting Lake Stewards early!
Find out more about the importance of the ongoing citizen science of the Lake Partner Program, here: https://foca.on.ca/lake-partner-program-overview/
Upcoming Events
FOCA’s Cottage Succession Seminar Series

Saturday, September 21, 2019 – Haliburton. Our final session of the season with estate lawyer Peter Lillico takes place at the Haliburton Campus of Fleming College, co-hosted by the Soyers Lake Ratepayers Association and the Lake Kashagawigamog Organization. For event time, and how to save your spot, visit:

Can’t attend in person, or want to review the seminar material with your family members in the off-season? Consider a DVD purchase of one of Peter’s talks. Info about the DVDs is also available at the link above.

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2019 Lake Links

Saturday, October 26, 2019 – Perth. FOCA will once again be pleased to support and attend this annual stewardship event. The theme is “Enhancing, Restoring and Exploring: Applications for Citizen Science on your Lake.” Click here to download the event poster (PDF, 1 page).

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FOCA Fall Seminar for Lake Associations

Saturday, November 16, 2019 – Toronto. Mark your calendar and plan to send a representative from your lake association to this gathering of lake association peers, subject experts, and the FOCA staff and Board of Directors, to receive environmental and policy updates and to discuss cottage country hot topics and emerging issues.
FOCA’s Silver-level Sponsors
OPG
Cottage Life
HydroOne
AVIVA
Waterfront Living
Short-Term Rentals
After gathering public input on the topic of short-term rentals last year, this summer the City of Kawartha Lakes has dedicated a full webpage to the topic, including posters created to remind property owners and their visitors about by-law regulations and other important local information.
FOCA notes that some municipalities are implementing by-laws (and fines for those who do not comply) to encourage responsible rental. Others are regulating short-term rentals through zoning and licencing that includes safety inspections among other conditions. FOCA has posted lots of information for your review, here: https://foca.on.ca/responsible-cottage-rental/.
Recent Events Attended
Friends of Oak Lake Meeting
August 6, 2019 – Quinte. FOCA participated in a meeting of our member group, the Friends of Oak Lake, on the topic of water quality and water level issues in kettle lakes.
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FOCA Outreach
FOCA’s Outreach Assistant attended a meeting in Plevna on August 6th, organized by the Malcolm Ardoch Lakes Landowners’ Association, with university and municipal partners to discuss a Eurasian Water Milfoil pilot project. Download an overview by clicking here (PDF, 2 pages)
She also attended the Barrie Farmers Market on August 17th. Thanks again, and very good wishes to Olivia Huber, who has left to continue her education this fall.
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Environment Council Meeting
August 9, 2019 – Stoney Lake. FOCA’s Executive Director was a feature speaker about water quality monitoring at this gathering of the Environment Council for Clear, Ston(e)y and White Lakes.
The meeting also addressed the identification of Starry Stonewort in Kawarthas area waterbodies. Find out more about this invader in a presentation from the event. (download PDF, 16 pages)
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Birchcliff Property Owners Meeting

August 10, 2019 – FOCA participated in our member‘s Annual General Meeting, where road safety and building a strong membership were key topics.
All our members are welcomed to use association tools and tips found here:
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Severn Sound Environmental Meeting

August 23, 2019 – Port Severn. FOCA participated in an Open House about “Resilient & Thriving Great Lakes Watersheds” with partners in water quality monitoring, invasive species, source water protection and more. Find out more about SSEA, here:  https://www.severnsound.ca/about

FOCA’s Bronze-level Sponsors
OOWA
Dock in a Box
EORN
Nature Clean New Logo 2013
Sunspace
Canadian Canoe Museum
Regional Notices
3rd Binational Lake Association Event – Rainy Lake Area

Associations in Northwest Ontario area encouraged to attend this great event for lake association representatives from both sides of the border. Meet fellow lake stewards to discuss common interests and concerns, to learn about ecosystem management in the Lake of the Woods watershed, and about citizen lake monitoring. Click here to download event details (PDF, 1 page).
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Kawartha Lakes WATER Fund
Members in the City of Kawartha Lakes may still be able to apply for 2019 funding for projects that demonstrate an action from your lake’s management plan, and that have a positive impact on water quality. Click here to download (PDF, 3 pages) a notice from Kawartha Conservation or visit:
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Mississippi Watershed Plan:
call for Advisory Committee Members

The Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority is developing a Watershed Plan, and is looking for representation from across the watershed to review, comment, and advise on issues facing the Mississippi River watershed. Applications are due September 6, 2019. Find more information here:  http://mvc.on.ca/watershedplan/

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Muskoka Watershed Advisory Group
image: MPP Jeff Yurek on Twitter

In early August, the Ontario Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks announced the appointment of an advisory group that Minister Yurek described as: “a valuable resource for people and municipalities in the region that depend on effective watershed management as more development and flooding events occur.” Follow this issue, here:

Stewardship Publication
The Lake Protection Workbook

Over the past year, the Lake Links Planning Committee developed a resource workbook for waterfront property owners. This is a self-assessment tool that acts as an excellent educational resource, helping property owners living along a shoreline to understand how their actions can affect the lake, and providing helping tips on improving natural environment at the shoreline. Our partners have invited everyone to download a free PDF copy of the 44-page Workbook from this webpage: https://watersheds.ca/our-work/resources/publications/. Paper copies are also available for $1.50 each from Watersheds Canada.

Associations:
Help FOCA to spread the word to your members…

Got an Association meeting coming up? Please include a quick update from FOCA for your members. Share information from the 2018 Year in Review, or 20/20 Vision: Strategic Framework.

Have a 5 or 10 minute spot on your meeting agenda? Show one of FOCA’s videos! Stream them on YouTube if you’ve got internet access, or contact us for tips on downloading to a laptop:

Need an article for your Newsletter? Consider reproducing an article from FOCA’s last Lake Stewards Newsletter on lyme disease, cyber safety, or other topics. Or visit the FOCA website to search for other articles, by topic: https://foca.on.ca/resources/

Got some extra space in your Newsletter?Please include this little FOCA ad (click the image at the side to download a PDF – reproduce at 4″ width, maximum) to remind your members about our work and all the benefits they receive, as FOCA members!

Contact the office for assistance with any of these materials or file formats.
FOCA is the Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Associations,
the voice of the waterfront for over half a century
info@foca.on.ca    |    705-749-3622    |    https://foca.on.ca
Stay Connected with FOCA:
Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter  View our videos on YouTube
Didn’t receive this message in your Inbox? Join thousands of Elert subscribers:
 
FOCA believes everyone has the right to hear about issues that affect waterfront Ontario. 
Those who have an existing relationship with FOCA may receive email from us, based on principles of Express or Implied Consent in Canadian Anti Spam legislation.
You can unsubscribe from Elerts at any time, using the ‘Safe Unsubscribe’ link below.
Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Associations,#201 – 159 King Street, Peterborough, ON K9J 2R8 Canada
Sent by communications@foca.on.ca in collaboration with
Constant Contact
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Turtle hatchlings on the way!

Hello from Kelly at Think Turtle Conservation Initiative
We are now into the weeks possibly even days leading up to this seasons turtle nests hatching out. This will inevitably mean turtle hatchlings showing up on private property, public property, the ‘ROADS’ and places you may not expect and this will happen soon. Hatchling activity is more commonly associated with rural communities and cottage country, however please do not dismiss the outskirts of urban communities as being a places that hatchlings may show up if your travels take you to such areas.
Based on the many reports of turtles nesting later then usual in late June into July it is likely hatchings will begin to make an appearance mid September. The timing is of course dependent on when the female turtle laid the eggs, the species of turtle thus the length of the incubation period and the temperatures during the incubation period. In a warm year, turtle eggs will develop faster and the hatchings may hatch and emerge as early as mid August. In a cooler year, they may hatch later in the fall. This year has been a bit of a mixed bag starting off extremely hot, followed by consistent warm dry conditions and some regions in Ontario have been experiencing cooler temperatures for several weeks. Point being it is more so a bit of a guess this year but the month of September into October is when we can expect to see hatchlings making a mad dash for their intended body of water.
INCUBATION PERIOD
There are many factors that effect the outcome of the clutch size (number of eggs) and incubation period for the eight species of turtles native to Ontario in regards to nesting variance is usual. Please view the following as a general guideline;
(1) Blanding’s Turtle Painted Turtle – 4 to 13 oval shaped eggs, 60 to 90 days from the date the female turtle nested.
(2) Eastern Musk Turtle ‘Stinkpot’ – 2 to 5 oval shaped eggs 60 to 90 days.
(3) Northern Map Turtle – 7 to 23 oval shaped eggs, 60 to 90 days and hatchlings sometimes remain in the nest cavity until the spring, called ‘overwintering.’
(4) Painted Turtle – 3 to 15 oval shaped eggs, 60 to 90 days and hatchlings often remain in the nest cavity until the spring, called ‘overwintering.’
(5) Snapping Turtle – 6 to 104 round shaped eggs, 80 to 90 days.
(6) Spiny-Soft Shell – 3 to 43 round shaped eggs, 55 to 100 days.
(7) Spotted Turtle – 2 to 8 oval shaped eggs, 55 to 80 days and hatchlings may remain in the nest cavity until the spring, called ‘overwintering.’
(8) Wood Turtle – 4 to 12 oval shaped eggs, 60 to 90 days.
FOUND A HATCHLING
The hatchlings face many challenges once they emerge from their nest to make the journey to their intended body of water. Some hatchlings travels may include crossing a road and the risk of getting run over by a car, in addition to this is the numerous potential predators they could encounter between the nest and their intended body of water. Hatchlings that do make it across a road safely may then have to negotiate terrain obstacles such as curbs or fences, others may die from dehydration on a hot day. By all the powers that be it is hoped that all hatchlings are spotted and intercepted before they attempt to make the dangerous trek across the roads which will also enable them to bypass predators and other challenges they could face.
Being so small, most hatchlings are little more than the size of a loonie and not always that easy to spot on the roads, please be extra focused on the road ahead of you while driving over the coming weeks. If you have passengers with you, enlist them as lookouts. The survival rate for turtle hatchings is less then 1% so any chance of improving on this dismal percentage increases the possibility of more hatchlings reaching adulthood.
If you stop to assist a hatchling, juvenile or adult turtle across the road please pull your motor vehicle completely off the road and on to the shoulder as far over as possible and put your hazard lights on. Braking for turtles and/or any other wildlife is dangerous as is parking your car in the middle of a lane, both can cause accidents and should be avoided. Make safety your #1 priority! Please think of your safety, the safety of any passengers with you and the safety of other motorists on the road. Having a safety vest close at hand in your vehicle is always recommended and not just for assisting turtles, a safety vest will make you more visible while standing on or near a road.
Always move the turtle (hatchling, juvenile or adult) in the direction the turtle is headed. Hatchlings may be little but they have a good sense of where they are going. Admittedly some do seem to end up a little off course and disoriented as mentioned they do face challenges. Always handle hatchlings carefully, their shells are soft and pliable. A firm but gentle grip will suffice while taking take a hatchling to the nearest body of water in the direction the hatchling was headed. Once there please do not release the hatching into open water. There are predators just lying in wait. Scout out the area for a spot that has a shallow area and ideally varying water depths in the vicinity and has vegetation and/or leafy debris that will serve as protective covering for the hatchling. A hatchling will spend much of their early years hiding until they have gained some size and girth and are not so vulnerable to predators.
Sometimes finding the perfect location for releasing hatchlings may not be possible on foot or accessible from the shoreline in which case using hip waders or a canoe could be helpful. As much effort as possible that can go into finding an ideal location for a safe release might just be the factor that significantly increases the chances of survival for the hatchlings you release.
If you encounter an injured turtle (hatchling, juvenile or adult) or have a concern related to the turtle’s well being please call the turtle hospital at the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre 705-741-5000.
CHILDREN & TURTLES
It is wonderful to learn of children spending time outdoors connecting with nature. If you have children, grandchildren or spend time with children in a working capacity it is important to teach them that hatchlings observed in the wild should be left in the wild. They are not lonely or looking for their mother or a friend All of the eight species of turtles native to Ontario whether a hatchling, juvenile or adult are not to be taken home as pets, it is in fact illegal to remove turtles from the wild and/or have them as pets. With the excitement of turtle hatchlings and kids please watch kids around the roads near your property.
PETS & TURTLES
It is a sad fact but sometimes our beloved pets can cause stress, injury or death to a turtle at varying stages of development (egg, hatchling, juvenile or adult).
There have been unfortunate cases of cats getting a hold of turtle hatchlings newly emerged from their nest or while the hatchlings are on route to their intended body of water. Quite often these circumstances do not end well given the size of the hatchlings and vulnerability of a turtle hatchling versus cat teeth or claws.
The family dog may have never hurt a fly but in the course of routine outdoor activities unfortunately encounters do occur between dogs and turtles (eggs, hatchling, juvenile and adult). Dogs have been known to accidentally dig up turtle nests, eat turtle eggs, view a hatchling, juvenile or adult turtle as a chew toy and in some cases given the dog(s) concerned the encounter surpasses curiosity or playfulness and is an attack on a turtle.
No matter the circumstances these unfortunate incidents come down to our beloved pets acting instinctively at the time. Should any of the circumstances outlined above occur as a result of your cat or dog please do not attempt to treat a wounded or injured turtle yourself or put any ointments on or into the wound or release the turtle back into the water. Turtles have an anatomy much different to humans and no matter how small the injury may seem medical attention from a trained veterinarian should be sought. This is available in Ontario for the Ontario turtles at no charge. If a turtle requires medical attention please call the turtle hospital at 705-741-5000 as soon as possible.
The turtle hospital is officially known as the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre (OTCC) home of the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre. They admit turtles from all across Ontario. The hospital is located at 1434 Chemong Road, Unit #4 in Peterborough and is presently the only wildlife rehabilitation centre in Ontario dedicated “SOLEY” to providing medical and rehabilitative care to the Ontario turtles. It is Ontario’s ‘TURTLE HOSPITAL.’ Once treated and rehabilitated the turtles are released back into their natural habitat at the point of origin where it is hoped they will live a long life and continue to reproduce for many decades.
Please do not assume that a private animal clinic, wildlife rehabilitator or animal shelter in the area you are located or may be visiting will admit a turtle or is trained to offer turtle first aid or treatment. OTCC works in conjunction with 35 first response private animal clinics and wildlife rehabilitators throughout Ontario that are trained in “basic” turtle first aid and pain management. All injured turtles should be reported to the OTCC. When you speak with the OTCC staff they will assess the circumstances and if necessary they will direct you to the nearest first response team able to administer basic first aid and/or pain management and temporarily admit the turtle until arrangements can be made to have the turtle transferred to the OTCC. The availability of the first response private animal clinics and/or wildlife rehabilitators varies so when OTCC has referred you to one please call the private animal clinic and/or wildlife rehabilitator you were referred to prior to going there to arrange a drop-off time.
If and injury to a turtle was caused by your cat or dog please do not feel uncomfortable or embarrassed to call the turtle hospital. It is unfortunate when and if this happens but by doing what you can to get proper medical attention for the injured turtle this gives the turtle the best possible chance of surviving their injuries. There can be some disfigurement or scaring after a cat/dog encounter but a turtle that can be treated and recovers will then be released back into the wild. This is important to species recovery efforts and ensuring future generations of turtles.
If the injury to a turtle is of a nature that although healed would leave the turtle vulnerable and unable to function to the point of taking care of their basic needs in the wild the turtle would in all likelihood become a teaching turtle. This being a very important role for such a turtle acting as an ambassador for his/her species.
When you phone OTCC to report an injured turtle or concern the trained staff will assess the turtle circumstance you have called about and determine the best course of action. If a turtle needs to be admitted to the OTCC it is always appreciated if you can drive the injured turtle to Peterborough but if you are not able to there is a ‘Turtle Taxi’ and a ride will be arranged via their network of ‘Taxi Turtle’ volunteers. OTCC is always looking for volunteers should you be interested in helping the turtles this way during turtle season. If interested in finding out more information about this please call 705-741-5000 or e-mail volunteer@ontarioturtle.ca. Taxi Turtle volunteers will also have the opportunity to be involved in turtle releases during the turtle season.
Always best to put cats and dogs in the house or in their outdoor enclosure if a turtle nest is hatching out on your property.
With hatchlings showing up anytime soon it is of course realized that you cannot watch your cat or dog every minute while outdoors. Please take extra care if you observe your cat/dog very intently focused on an area in your yard especially if you observed possible nesting activities on your property or public property your cat/dog has access to. If there are any concerns about a hatchling found please call the OTCC.
TURTLE NEST PROTECTORS
If you had a turtle nest on your property and you have a nest protector installed based on the date the female turtle nested you should be vigilantly monitoring the nest 2 to 3 weeks prior to the possible hatch out date. Again, sorry I’m not able to offer any exact dates. Couldn’t hurt to enlist help monitoring a nest getting close to the end of the incubation period. If you are going to be going out and not able to arrange for someone to monitor the turtle nest in your absence you should take the exit hole out so the escape route in available to the hatchlings should they show up. If you are going on vacation and are not able to arrange a monitor you should definitely remove the exit hole and consider removing the nest protector if you feel it necessary. Please note that a hatchling can become dehydrated in a short period of time if left in the sun. Hopefully you will get to see the joyous event it really is quite special.
LATE ARRIVALS
There seems to be no typical pattern to the weather each season. Each year varies from the last. These changes have had an effect on hatchlings in particular the last couple years. As was the case in 2017 many hatchlings emerged very late. I personally drove hatchlings to the OTCC on October 28th. Last year the cold temperatures and winter weather moved in six weeks early as a result hatchlings showing up late did not have an adequate amount of time between hatching and the time they would head into formation (hibernation) to assimilate to their surroundings. Should you find a hatchling or hatchlings late in to October or when temperatures are unseasonably cool please contact the OTCC. Hatchlings under these circumstances may in fact be in adequately prepared to be heading into brumation (hibernation). The OTCC may recommend that the hatchlings spend their first winter at OTTC and be released in the spring when they stand a better chance of assimilating to their habitat and moving forward on their journey. As the finder you would be contacted when the hatchling(s) are ready to be released to see if you would like to be involved with the release.
PAINTED TURTLES
If per chance the turtle you observed this turtle season nesting on your property or in a location you are monitoring was a painted turtle don’t get upset if the turtle nest you so diligently protected and/or have kept an eye on shows no sign of hatching activity. Incredibly painted turtle hatchlings often spend their first winter in their nest or below the nest cavity only a few inches below the frost line after hatching in the fall. This is a survival strategy known as, ‘overwintering’ used to escape limited food supplies, possible predators, cold temperatures and harsh winter conditions. Ice crystals form around the painted turtles and marginally in them but a self-generated type of antifreeze prevents them from an assured death. They remain in a super cooled state until the spring when the ground thaws and the little turtles emerge from their nest, raring ta go. They could show up on your property, in your garden, all manner of places as well as on the roads.
WINTER HABITAT
In addition to the hatchlings arriving soon we can expect to see more turtle activity on the roads in general October to early November. Again timing is in relation to the fall temperatures and weather patterns. October to November is typical when the turtles will be on the move to their winter habitat of choice. For some a short journey for others longer but during these travels there is always a distinct possibility of having to cross the roads.
REPORTING TURTLE SIGHTINGS
Officially reporting any and all hatchling, juvenile or adult turtle sightings dead or alive is very important. This enables conservation agencies and wildlife conservation organizations involved in species at risk studies to identify and better understand the distribution of the various turtle species and the factors that have an effect on their activities. With access to this type of data and research they can identify areas that would most benefit from the installation of permanent mitigation measures such as under passes and fencing as well as assessing the suitability of pre-existing culverts that could be re-worked to serve as an effective mitigation site.
If you are not already reporting turtle sightings please checkout the various citizen science programs (see below) to acquaint yourself with the kind of information you will need to supply. Photo documentation is always recommended to substantiate your sighting and the type of turtle. Note: If taking a photo of a turtle you will be assisting across a road please ensure your safety by taking a photo of the turtle after you have moved the turtle off the road and you are both safely as far over on the shoulder as possible and out of harms way.
For anyone that reports sights on ocassion to the Ontario Reptile & Amphibian Atlas (ORAA) and may have missed the news, the ORAA has transitioned from the data collection phase of thieir project to the data analysis phase. The ORAA app went offline August 15th. If you would like to send any unsubmitted data to the ORAA, you can do so until December 1st. Please submit a spreadsheet to atlas@ontarionature.org.
For anyone that was reporting to the ORAA you are encouraged to continue submitting your turtle sightings through the other citizen science program options available to use. People new to reporting sightings should review each program and decide on one. Sightings are only to be reported officially to one of the programs.
Turtle Guardians – The recently launched Turtle Guardians citizen science and recovery program is very user friendly being designed with kids in mind, adults will equally enjoy these features. The latest version of the Turtle Guardian App is live for Android Phones. Now you can report turtle sightings and track how many you helped….also pass the turtle test to get your ID card. For anyone preferring not to report through a mobile device they have an Online Sighting Report Form. You will also be asked if you would like your sighting information sent to government agencies. This would include Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC).
Ontario Turtle Tally – This is a fun, easy turtle monitoring project for people of all ages through the Toronto Zoo’s Adopt-A-Pond Wetlands Conservation Program. It’s a great activity for schools, families, cottagers, and community and naturalist groups across the province. Report your turtle sightings by entering your observations into the on-line database. The purpose is to collect, record and store location and species information on Ontario turtles, including species at risk.
iNaturalist – This Canada-wide citizen science program is a community-based tool. Your observations will be vetted by researchers, experts and other citizen scientists.
Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC) – Submit your species at risk observations to the ‘NHIC’ project on iNaturalist by clicking the ‘add observations button’ on the project home page. If you prefer to compile your records in a spreadsheet, email it to the Natural Heritage Information Centre.
Note: The information collected in the various citizen science program databases would be verified and submitted to the Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC) after which it is reviewed and entered into the provincial record. Many agencies and researchers use the provincial record to plan, protect and study Ontario’s natural heritage. The information helps natural resources management and conservation decisions in Ontario as well as biodiversity conservation strategies for the Great Lakes region.
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It would be greatly appreciated it you could share this post with family, friends and associates and ask them to do the same.
If you have any turtle related questions please do not hesitate to get in touch. If the matter is to do with a live turtle or is time sensitive always best to call my cell 647-606-9537. Other matters it is appreciated if they could be e-mailed or sent via Facebook messenger. I will get back to you.
Over the coming weeks the more people keeping an eye out for the hatchlings and as always the adults and juvenile turtles as well the better! Thank you so much for all your efforts looking for the Ontario turtles this turtle season.
Hoping today is an especially nice day for one and all!
Kindest Regards,
Kelly Wallace
Think Turtle Conservation Initiative
Cell: 647-606-9537
Facebook: thinkturtleci
Username: Wallace Kathleen Kelly

Potential mine comes back to life

LWRA Community:We have unfortunate news to share on the status of the McBride mining project (bounded roughly in the area between Hwy 62, Hwy 620, Old Hastings Road and North Steenburg Lake Road), but nonetheless important to keep our community aware (and involved).

It appears the proponent of this project, Derek McBride, has applied for and been granted a new Exploration Plan.   His former filed Plan had expired May 7, 2019.  Notice of approval of the new plan was shared with a cottager on another lake in the area, who has remained in contact with the office of the Minister of Energy, Northern Development and Mines, and ministry staff in Sudbury (see below, names redacted…).

While at this time, we have no specific knowledge of any work underway at the site, nor of funding sources to advance such work, McBride’s last public comments indicated that he would continue to look for and secure funding to advance this project.

Perhaps the most disturbing part of the Plan approval by the Ontario Government (Ministry of Energy, Northern Development and Mines), is that despite well known community opposition to mining activity in this area, no notice was given to any of the potentially impacted parties who have previously commented (including Township of Limerick) to input on the Plan prior to its approval.

Ed Offshack, LWRA Director

Subject: RE: McBride Project Limerick Township

Good afternoon…..

 

Hastings Highlands Resources Limited former exploration plan, PL-17-10717 expired on May 6, 2019. Exploration plans are not renewed. Hastings Highlands Resources Limited did submit a new exploration plan (PL-19-00091) which became effective on July 27, 2019, and is valid for two years. The authorized activities are very early level exploration activities on existing mining claims held by Hastings Highlands Resources Limited. The limited activities could consist of:

 

  • Geophysical surveying using a generator to measure the electromagnetic properties in bedrock. Minerals or ores in the bedrock can act as conductors for electromagnetic energy. Their electromagnetic properties will be different from bedrock that does not have zones of minerals or bodies of ore. Geophysical surveys look for these differences to find areas that are likely to contain minerals or ores and potentially target them for further exploration.
  • Surface stripping of an area of less than 100 metres to remove overburden from bedrock. The exposed rock can be useful for observation and interpretation of type and composition of the bedrock
  • Pitting and trenching of bedrock of up to a maximum of 3 cubic metres for assaying, testing and other sampling purposes. Trenches or pits are excavated into the rock to expose more of the mineralized zones for sampling and testing.

 

ENDM does not have any information on the status of this early exploration project.

 

Slow motion sailing in 2019

The 2019 Limerick Sailboat Race was another test of “light wind” sailing skills as Mother Nature was not huffing and puffing on Sunday, August 4 at 2 pm. With only a very light breeze from the north, even deciding which way to go around the islands split the competition with half taking the traditional clockwise route while the rest of the pack sailed off to the east for a try at running down the narrow channel between the islands and the mainland.  

At that point in the first lap there was still hope the wind might build up and allow the traditional two lap race. That was not to be. Valiant attempts to throw out spinnakers to catch the occasional puffs were in vain. One lap was going to decide the winner in 2019.

Turning the mid-lake marker the first four vessels, two manned by the Hannah crews from Maintenance Point (Apple Turnover and Blue Bird), the beautiful wooden Albacore with the Kalisz Brothers demonstrating how much about sailing one can learn on Youtube in a few short months, and a mysterious newcomer from Fraser’s Beach in a long-retired Laser with its sail reinforced with duct tape, headed out wide to try to gain a good angle for the final run across the finish line. Turning the marker the Hannah’s third boat, Mellow Yellow, was chasing the Hunter 18 sailed by the 2017 race winning crew from the Coxwell cottage, and with a slight shift in what little wind there was they both decided that tacking straight for the finish line marker was their only hope. 

Meanwhile the other four boats were all stalled near shore about 50 yards from the finish line marker. Sailors do a lot of praying and the Hunter and Mellow Yellow were both likely imagining that miracle gust which would slip them in front of the four stalled boats. Apparently they were praying to the wrong gods and slowly but surely the stalled boats began to creep along the shoreline. At one point the Kalisz Brothers looked like they were going to win this race but word has it some critical piece of rigging decided it was a good time to depart their craft and they were soon headed backwards. These intrepid sailors managed to repair the rigging but by this time the Laser had slowly, silently slipped across the finish line and Apple Turnover nudged in to nose the Kalisz Brothers into third place. 

It was an interesting race tactically with several new competitors in 2019. Bob Bennett was back after several years absence following his old Laser getting demasted in the very, very high-wind race in the mid-2000s. His birthday surprise from his wife Sue was a very fast looking sailboat called an Aero if memory serves. Since he never got close enough to the pack I cannot verify the type. However, next year Sue must give him a new watch because Bob’s new boat was not nearly fast enough to catch the others since he was still in the wind shadow of the north shore as the starting horn blasted at 2 pm sharp.  Also missing from the lineup this year was Mel Hamilton-Porter who would certainly have been in the running under these conditions. As it was the old Laser, sailed by Adam Aippersbach of Fraser Beach, took the trophy over to the north shore this year. Adam is from Vancouver and along with members of the Fraser Clan he had flown in just the day before and put the old Laser back in the water just in time for the race. 

Each year the trophy resides in the winner’s cottage and their name gets engraved on a brass plaque for the historical record. Adam teaches kids to sail out on the salty water of the west coast so his win proves this race can be won in any kind of sailing vessel with the right tactics and technique … especially if you are at the start line when the horn goes off.  

Below: Greg Hannah presents Adam Aippersbach from Fraser’s Beach with the 2019 Sailboat Race trophy. The fireplace ledge at Hannah’s will seem empty this year.

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